Relearning Photography

 

Photographer
On Reflection

 

Making better use of your camera by being able to change the settings to be a little more creative using the lens takes a little practice. The next workshop in The Photographers Garden will be on 22nd June, 2018.

We will be a small group with varied experience in taking photographs, aiming to be able to use our cameras on manual settings. Avoiding the ‘snap and shoot’ tendency, through our new learning we can become more thoughtful and creative, adding more enjoyment in using our cameras and creating more fulfilling photographs.

The day begins at 10 am, lunch (provided) around 12.30 finishing with coffee and a chat around 3 pm. There is the option of a free consultation during the weeks after the workshop for further help and discussion about your photography.
The cost for the workshop is £90.

Refining the Visuals

Photographer

Making better use of your camera by being able to change the settings to be a little more creative using the lens takes a little practice. The next workshop in The Photographers Garden will be on 22nd June, 2018.

We will be a small group with varied experience in taking photographs, aiming to be able to use our cameras on manual settings. Avoiding the ‘snap and shoot’ tendency, through our new learning we can become more thoughtful and creative, adding more enjoyment in using our cameras and creating more fulfilling photographs.

The day begins at 10 am, lunch (provided) around 12.30 finishing with coffee and a chat around 3 pm. There is the option of a free consultation during the weeks after the workshop for further help and discussion about your photography.
The cost for the workshop is £90.

Gently does it

Photographer

It is a long term plan, not one that I can execute quickly. The design of the gardens here are not so much a planned design to install quickly, but more of an evolution. It is refreshing to learn about gardeners like Bernard Tickner who developed Fullers Mill over 50 years. Now that might be my pace of creating a garden! Although in reality, I don’t have fifty years left, I’m in no rush. Gently and carefully does it.

Sharing Spaces

Photographer

The garden is still so very wet, so after cutting back an overgrown rose, I left the cut branches in a heap and thought I would move them out when the grass dries up and I can get the garden tractor in. When indeed it did dry up, I moved the branches to find three partridge eggs. What a wonderful sight. And it was, until the new inhabitants  stripped the leaves off my newly planted out brassicas, heralding the purchase of new nets.

I won’t be so hospitable next spring, be warned.

Sweet Paper Pots

Photographer

Pricing up root trainers for sweet pea, pea and beans,  the cost was such that I could buy several new fruit trees with that money. So, scrounging used newspapers from a friend in the village who actually buys one daily and has no online facility, I made paper pots for sweet pea and beans instead of buying more plastic pots.

 

Frozen Visuals

Photographer

So cold, freezing temperatures mean the garden is suffering, even the brussel sprouts are looking sad. But, after a surreal autumn, getting out the Hasselblad again was a treat, even with frozen fingertips.

Winter in Northumberland strips the garden back to its bare bones but it is an opportunity to get to know those bones and structure to be able to flesh it out in springtime.

As a social documentary and portrait photographer, it is also necessary to dig to the bare bones of anything I photograph. Understanding the subject matter or the sitter is fundamental to good storytelling.